Exceptional Kitten and Puppy CareWestminster Exotic Animal Hospital Baby Pet Care

If you have just introduced a new puppy or kitten into your home, congratulations! These first few weeks with your new friend will be full of both excitement and challenges as you get to know your young pet. However, it is very important that you remember to involve your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Just like a human baby, animal babies require health care early on to ensure that they are healthy and growing properly. For example, puppies and kittens need to receive vaccinations promptly so that they will be immune to a wide range of destructive, yet preventable, diseases.

Depending on each particular pet, vaccinations are generally given to puppies and kittens when they are between eight and 16 weeks old. However, you should bring your new pet to the veterinarian for a general physical examination even if it is not old enough to receive shots.

Westminster Veterinary Group is here to support you as you get to know your new pet. During your pet’s first visit to our office, one of our expert veterinarians will give the puppy or kitten a thorough physical examination, discuss spaying or neutering and advise you on how to provide your new pet with a nutritional diet that will support healthy growth. Our expert staff can also give you tips on training your puppy or kitten and discuss any behavioral problems that you may have encountered.

Start off on the right foot with your new puppy or kitten by bringing them to Westminster Veterinary Group as early as possible. We will help to ensure that your new companion grows up to be happy and healthy.

 

A possible vaccination schedule for the ‘average’ indoor house cat is shown below.

Age

 

Vaccination
6-7 weeksCombination Vaccine*
10 weeks

 

Combination vaccine
Chlamydophila (Pneumonitis): include in combination vaccine where it is a concern.
12 weeks or older

 

Rabies: Given by your local veterinarian (age at vaccination may vary according to local law).
13 weeks

 

Combination vaccine
Chlamydophila (Pneumonitis): include in combination vaccine where it is a concern.
Feline Leukemia (FeLV): for kittens at risk of exposure to feline leukemia virus.
16 & 19 weeks

 

Combination vaccine
FeLV: for kittens at risk of exposure to feline leukemia virus.
Adult (boosters)**

 

Combination vaccine
Chlamydophila (Pneumonitis): include in combination vaccine where it is a concern.
FeLV: for cats at risk of exposure to feline leukemia virus.
Rabies: Given by your local veterinarian (time interval between vaccinations may vary according to law).
 

*A combination vaccine includes feline distemper, rhinotracheitis, and calicivirus. Some may also include Chlamydophila. **According to the American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Association of Feline Practitioners, cats at low risk of disease exposure may not need to be boostered yearly for most diseases. Consult with your local veterinarian to determine the appropriate vaccination schedule for your cat. Remember, recommendations vary depending on the age, breed, and health status of the cat, the potential of the cat to be exposed to the disease, the type of vaccine, whether the cat is used for breeding, and the geographical area where the cat lives or may visit.